Legacy Committee

Legacy Commission

In the 21st century, Charlotte is a city that is growing fast, simultaneously becoming more racially and ethnically diverse and socioeconomically disparate. A mosaic of longtime residents and newcomers from across the U.S. and around the world creates both a dynamic cultural landscape and new challenges that force us to consider issues of equity and inclusion.

There is a legacy of racial discrimination in Charlotte that has denied African Americans and other people of color the opportunities to participate fully in the city’s government, civic life, economy and educational advancement. Vestiges of this legacy are symbolically represented in streets, monuments, and buildings named in honor of slave owners, champions of the Confederacy, and proponents of white supremacy.

The Legacy Commission believes that the continued memorialization of slave owners, Confederate leaders, and white supremacists on street signs does not reflect the values that Charlotte upholds today and is a direct affront to descendants of the enslaved and oppressed African Americans who labored to build this city.

The Commission recommends changing street names and reimagining civic spaces to create a new symbolic landscape that is representative of the dynamic and diverse city Charlotte has become and reflective of the inclusive vision it strives to achieve.

Review the Legacy Commission’s final recommendations


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well i think we're on the home stretch

03:34

um

03:36

we have uh several items to cover

03:39

um and i'll just give you an overview of

03:42

what we're going to walk

03:43

you around i apologize that we don't

03:45

have the agenda for everyone

03:47

i'm going to review the media coverage

03:50

that's been received to date

03:52

uh a recommendation that we have at the

03:55

request

03:56

of cdot the city of charlotte's

03:59

department of transportation

04:01

a request from crescent communities to

04:04

consider

04:05

and then tiffany's going to give us an

04:07

update on the community

04:09

feedback we've received so far and then

04:12

we will wrap up

04:14

and take any questions um about next

04:17

week's presentation to

04:18

the city council um

04:22

um i hope all of you saw the observer

04:25

ran

04:25

a front page piece about

04:28

the work and there have been at least

04:31

several

04:32

letters to the editor in response

04:36

i don't know if there have been

04:37

additional ones that i've missed

04:39

but i know there were at least three and

04:42

then

04:42

three television stations have requested

04:45

interviews that i did and i think

04:47

several of you may have participated in

04:50

in

04:50

more one or more of them um wsoc

04:54

wcnc and wccb

04:58

have all run pieces and they also i

05:01

think have really helped us in terms of

05:04

pushing out participation on the website

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i asked each of them to do that and i

05:11

think that that helped

05:13

drive some of the uh feedback we have

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gotten

05:17

i'm going to pause there and just ask

05:20

you

05:21

to comment on what you've seen or heard

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in the media

05:24

any thoughts reflections

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um this land this is not something i

05:41

heard in the media

05:41

i did read the letters and saw the

05:43

observer story but

05:45

a friend of mine lives in uh plantation

05:48

estates in matthew's

05:50

telling me that they have changed their

05:51

name officially now to matthews glenn

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and uh they are going to change all of

05:57

their addresses because they all live on

05:59

plantation state estates drive that's

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not charlotte but

06:03

you know it's starting to happen you

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know

06:06

thank you for that thanks

06:10

um anyone else

06:16

um did you think the coverage

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i mean first of all let me i guess i

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should ask how many of you actually saw

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the

06:24

have seen either read the observer

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report or

06:27

seen one of the news stories on one of

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the television stations

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okay i think okay um

06:39

i'm sorry

06:44

all right this donny donny i'm sorry i'm

06:47

getting a lot of static

06:48

um tiffany should we all be muted so we

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can hear

06:52

donny better

06:56

yes if everyone commute that would be

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easier

07:02

i was considered i think that reporting

07:03

today has been very balanced

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and the expected pushback i think you

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know is not unusual but

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right now it appears to be uh at least

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out there it's on balance and uh

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participates

07:17

more feedback

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but so far so good

07:24

uh anyone else have any observations

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about the coverage

07:30

or have heard anything in response to it

07:39

tom it was interesting i i haven't seen

07:42

the tv

07:43

pieces i was glad that um steve crump

07:46

um who is a senior uh correspondent

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and um a fast friend of charlotte

07:53

history that

07:53

uh he he did a segment i have not seen

07:56

it but i was glad to see him doing it

07:58

um on the observer um i usually don't

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read comments but i

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figured i'd uh steal myself and read

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them

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and fascinating they were all when i

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read it were all about the walton

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building

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which is on stonewall but it um

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it was named after an african-american

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city council person

08:20

who was also convicted of

08:25

homosexual encounter and so all the

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comments about street names had nothing

08:30

to do with street names they had to do

08:32

with uh that particular building

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and uh in that bit of history

08:38

i've got to go back i miss those so

08:40

obviously i haven't seen all the the

08:42

comments that came into the observer

08:44

so steve trump i didn't know steve had

08:46

done a piece he did something on wbtv

08:51

i believe so i'm facebook friends with

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him and i believe that came across my

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facebook that he was about to do that

08:56

and uh i didn't watch i apologize

08:59

oh okay okay um

09:04

tommy tomlinson did his on my mind piece

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about

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um street names or at least use it as a

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catalyst for

09:12

this week's segment um

09:18

well if there's no additional feedback

09:20

um on

09:22

on the street names tiffany can you pull

09:24

up all right and give the background

09:26

uh for cdot's request

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yes i'll pull up it i'll pull up the

09:33

recommendation now

09:47

uh while while tiffany's doing that um

09:52

is someone from c dot on today

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kathy in here yeah yeah um

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it was interesting um apparently when

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when um when i had given the update to

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city council about that we were going to

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consider some guidance

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on uh

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how to review street names that were

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being considered

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to recognize a person

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c-dot had a very strong reaction because

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typically unbeknownst to us

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c dot sort of had the sole authority to

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do that

10:35

and really didn't want to have that

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role and so kathy do you want to comment

10:41

further on that

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and then the discussions that ensued

10:44

sure i can do that

10:46

and i'll try to be brief um so i i mean

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i'm just gonna

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you know kind of cut to the chase i was

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talking to my director

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um about this and by ordinance

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the director of transportation has the

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authority

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to name streets and to rename streets

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and

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that um you know that could be

11:07

a a nice power to have but

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um probably not um

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a burden that most directors would want

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to have to carry on their shoulders

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right

11:19

and especially given all of the work

11:22

that's going into this

11:23

effort you don't want one person um

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well and she really doesn't want herself

11:30

kind of sitting in that hot seat

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so um as we talked through

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what the regular process is or the the

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process that we've used in the past to

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rename streets and to name streets at no

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point has there ever been

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any sort of subjective

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um criteria applied right it's kind of a

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list

11:56

of check boxes does it sound like

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another street is it a duplicate

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um is it fewer than 22 characters right

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it's all very objective you kind of mark

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the boxes

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but when it comes to for lack of a

12:09

better word

12:10

appropriateness of the name

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um there there's no screen for that

12:18

right there's there's nobody testing for

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that

12:21

or asking questions or doing any kind of

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research

12:24

and so when she and i were talking

12:27

we we felt like that was a pretty

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important

12:31

piece of this equation that's missing

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and so what what i've done

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is i reached out to tiffany and emily

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and asked

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if as part of your recommendations

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to council because it is a council you

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know this is a policy and this is

12:51

going to be council adopted would the

12:54

committee be willing to make a

12:56

recommendation

12:58

to add that as one of the qualifiers

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before we even get

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you know before we even get to the point

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that we send it over to the county and

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say okay

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we're gonna name or rename this street

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um

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and and we you know first of all as

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staff

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we're just not gonna have that level of

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expertise you all

13:16

clearly have the knowledge and the

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resources to be able to provide

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um this information and so

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that's sort of where we landed is to

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ask for your additional and contact

13:32

continued participation in this process

13:37

uh tiffany thank you kathy i appreciate

13:40

that background

13:41

tiffany this is not the revised language

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actually

13:45

this you know we had a revision to this

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language

13:50

that we said that um yeah

13:53

because um

13:56

wait the process remember i'm sorry go

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ahead

14:04

um

14:07

i can't that we had talked about the

14:09

legacy commission recommends that

14:12

c dot consult with historians to review

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street name

14:16

proposals and requests um

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let's see let me turn this off one

14:23

second

14:25

this was the original and then we said

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that because the legacy commission

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wouldn't be an ongoing body that we were

14:32

going to recommend that cdot

14:34

consult with historians to ensure

14:37

that any individual names um

14:46

tiffany my apology we talked about it

14:48

yesterday um

14:51

hold on let me look i'm sorry

14:54

emily and tiffany while you're looking

14:56

at it um this is lena

14:58

you know to the extent anything that we

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propose to

15:02

do causes the practice under the

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ordinance to be modified we need to

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think through that

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so maybe we need to have an offline

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conversation

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about that cathy because i don't know

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where you and lazar and and what you're

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meaning or suggesting

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with respect to consultation versus

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what's prescribed in the ordinance

15:23

elena so i i yeah it would i think what

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what we're proposing

15:27

is an ordinance change

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and i think that's i know that's the

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scope of where we are here so maybe we

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need to have a little additional

15:36

discussion about that i don't think we

15:38

need to get into it here

15:39

right so that might be a point we need

15:41

to take up something like lena i'm fine

15:43

with that we were just

15:44

responding to what cdot had asked of us

15:47

that if they wanted counsel the legacy

15:50

commission will no longer be

15:53

you know functioning so that they would

15:56

if you believe it's within the bounds of

15:59

the ordinance

16:00

to consult with historians but i mean

16:03

i'm fine with whatever we were

16:05

we were including this at their request

16:08

you know understood i just hadn't had an

16:10

opportunity to think through that or

16:12

uh you know so we can we can have that

16:15

discussion and kind of look at what the

16:17

language is and see if there are any

16:18

concerns there

16:21

that being the case you will just simply

16:23

need to let tiffany and me know whether

16:25

this point should be

16:27

included or referenced on monday or not

16:30

um because it's it wasn't currently in

16:33

the recommendations that were uh

16:37

approved by the full commission last

16:39

time that's why we were bringing it up

16:42

okay so to that point then lena is at

16:45

best

16:46

that you and i and emily discusses and

16:48

then i can send out a revised email to

16:50

the

16:51

to the full commission once we've

16:52

decided what would be appropriate

16:54

yeah and if we can have someone from

16:56

cdot as well okay

16:57

okay and i wanted to add to that um

17:03

i while we call it a policy our street

17:06

renaming

17:07

process i am not

17:11

certain that it is an official policy

17:14

i think it's an administrative

17:17

it's just the way that we've been doing

17:19

business which

17:21

may lina i mean you tell me may give us

17:24

a little more flexibility right we can

17:28

add it to the process or

17:31

if the intent of of this

17:34

group is to have a product that

17:37

is an official city council policy then

17:40

we would incorporate it that way

17:45

i think we need to take that into

17:46

consideration okay

17:48

we'll take a look at it okay yeah i mean

17:50

we can do anything administratively

17:52

basically right if we want to make a

17:54

change we'll make a change

17:56

well let me ask let me ask since we're

17:58

going to have this conversation offline

18:00

but i want to ask the commission for the

18:03

without the

18:04

direct specific um

18:07

i just want to make sure everyone is

18:09

comfortable with the recommendation

18:11

that cdot if permissible by statue or

18:16

ordinance

18:17

um or a policy would consult with a

18:20

historian to vet

18:22

the from any proposed name changes

18:25

it was really not so much to um

18:29

it was as much to prevent as to affirm

18:33

if that makes sense

18:34

that you know i mean

18:37

yeah emily this is alan cronivet i think

18:39

that makes sense but i think that

18:41

our recommendation i think if we leave

18:45

it to quote unquote historian

18:48

then that's going to leave a lot of

18:49

interpretation to

18:51

the staff as to who's the historian

18:54

what's the qualification you know is it

18:58

someone who's local

18:59

is it someone at a university so i'm not

19:02

exactly sure what other guidance

19:04

the staff would like from us is it the

19:07

historian at the levine museum of the

19:09

new south i mean that's a you know

19:11

or something because i think if we just

19:13

have a generic term historian

19:16

then that could lead to all kinds of

19:19

unintended discussion about

19:22

the credentials of that historian you

19:24

know all kinds of things that um

19:26

um well intended but we have we we

19:29

haven't thought through so

19:31

i just raised that as something to for

19:33

further consideration

19:35

sure i i i hear that very much um

19:39

i i i i take your point completely

19:43

um initially when we thought about it

19:46

tiffany and i

19:47

were you know it the implementation of

19:51

this

19:52

it seems to me is a decision to be made

19:54

by

19:55

either city council or the city manager

19:58

i mean that it's not i mean i i didn't

20:01

really feel it was

20:02

our role to be ultra uh

20:06

specific on implementation on any of

20:08

this because implementation wasn't

20:10

really our charge our charge was

20:13

here recommendations now the city

20:16

council determines

20:17

whether they're going to go forward with

20:18

those recommendations and how they're

20:20

implemented would typically be

20:22

determined by the

20:23

city manager and his staff so

20:26

that that's why it's a fine line i mean

20:28

i think that

20:30

you know we don't in fact i don't know i

20:32

i'm

20:33

i'm trying to thread this walk it

20:36

carefully

20:37

about what is our proper role and what

20:39

is not and i take your point completely

20:42

but but i i don't know other people's

20:44

thoughts about that

20:46

um

20:50

well i agree with with alan on that i

20:52

think you have to have some

20:55

specificity i don't know that we need to

20:57

specify who that

20:58

should be but i you do want uh

21:02

you know the staff to be able to go with

21:04

a name

21:05

you know somebody comes in with the name

21:06

of a person they want to name the

21:08

street after and they they you know have

21:11

to know

21:12

you know like who is this person and

21:15

they have to you know check them out

21:16

and i i don't know the best way to do

21:19

that

21:20

would it be i'm asking and part of this

21:22

is for city staff

21:23

i mean would it be um historians

21:27

designated by the city manager by city

21:30

council i don't know the

21:31

i don't know city protocol or how

21:35

these decisions are made i guess um i'm

21:44

just sitting here trying to think if we

21:45

do anything

21:47

similar in any of our other

21:50

programs or processes um

21:54

i think most definitely we would want to

21:58

have you know a primary point of contact

22:01

like you know who

22:02

who do we go to and i know tom doesn't

22:05

want his phone ringing you know 20 times

22:08

a year

22:08

and um although his name is is the one

22:11

that typically comes up when there's a

22:13

history question

22:14

um in our in our circles in the

22:18

government center but

22:19

um you know i don't know if it's

22:22

um if it's a volunteer if it's somebody

22:26

that's already

22:27

on some other citizens advisory board

22:32

um and where we could maybe piggyback on

22:34

that

22:36

um is anybody in this group on any other

22:39

kind of

22:40

council advisory committees

22:45

uh one possibility would be either the

22:47

historic district commission or the

22:49

historic landmarks commission and

22:53

that might be a way to rope that yeah i

22:55

i think i

22:56

i i'm happy to have this go on as long

22:58

as you want

22:59

but i i think we're beyond our

23:01

collective expertise at the moment

23:03

so uh okay yeah you're right you're

23:05

beyond mine anyway

23:08

all good questions everything that's

23:10

being raised is really good

23:11

well should we um this is mary i have a

23:15

quick suggestion maybe to get a get us

23:17

out of this little patch of weeds we

23:19

seem to have stumbled into

23:21

um should we just have a suggestion that

23:24

the city manager devised

23:26

a simple process that might include

23:29

several members of the community to meet

23:33

as needed

23:34

or um or or you know give them a short

23:38

menu of possibilities because my guess

23:40

is that they're not going to want to

23:42

have to think it through

23:43

even to the extent that we are thinking

23:44

it through right now

23:46

um but give them a short menu

23:49

appointed citizen committee landmarks

23:53

commission

23:54

somebody with expertise in local history

23:58

i mean i think of tom obviously tom and

24:00

dr griffin

24:01

but um but it's entirely possible they'd

24:04

not be able to

24:05

be around we wanted to do this we're

24:07

wanting to do this in the next 10 years

24:11

so something fairly generic that

24:12

includes um expert in local history

24:16

i think that's spot on and then make

24:18

make the whole logistics figuring out

24:21

how that

24:22

how how that gets implemented put that

24:24

burden

24:25

back on city staff and and will figure

24:28

something out

24:29

okay well we'll figure out uh between

24:32

tiffany lena and and kathy language that

24:36

will

24:37

uh express the intent and as mary

24:40

described if some

24:41

menu of options the city manager can use

24:45

does that sound like a plan

24:48

everybody thumbs up on that one um

24:51

okay another piece that has come

24:54

up since our last meeting

24:58

is a request from crescent communities

25:02

elizabeth mcmillan who is one of the

25:04

developers working on the river district

25:07

has has asked the commission to consider

25:11

including the their request um

25:15

for a name change um

25:18

in our recommendations and um

25:22

we can send you the letter that we

25:24

received overnight

25:26

uh tiffany and i have both spoken to

25:29

elizabeth mcmillan

25:31

and involves uh dixie river road

25:36

which is uh out obviously near the river

25:40

um and apparently there were several

25:42

high schools that were consolidated in

25:44

the early 20th century and were called

25:46

dixie um and and then

25:49

if the road was named after them tom i

25:51

don't know if that's correct or not

25:54

but they very they feel very strongly

25:56

that they're working

25:58

toward building an inclusive community

26:00

that welcomes

26:01

everyone and they think having a main

26:04

uh street of that development named

26:07

dixie

26:08

could be a deterrent to businesses and

26:11

families

26:12

so um what tiffany and i

26:16

we made no commitment i said i would

26:18

bring it to the commission

26:20

what i did say was it seems to me that

26:23

we could

26:24

we have a recommendation that that says

26:27

the commission encourages and supports

26:30

neighborhoods

26:30

and developers who want to

26:35

request street name changes that we

26:38

would i could

26:39

cite this that the commission supports

26:42

this recommendation in in the spirit of

26:45

that

26:46

what we had stated previously but i am

26:48

totally open to what others think

26:51

um

26:54

to me that sounds perfect dixie

26:58

it was a community name um at least as

27:01

far back as the early 20th century

27:03

and i don't really know how it got

27:05

started um but i do

27:07

uh know a lot of folks um who

27:10

lived back there or had um family back

27:13

there

27:13

including the carter family when they

27:16

were on wbt radio here in the 1930s

27:21

most of the community is gone because it

27:24

was wiped out by the

27:26

um runway out there

27:29

um and so on on one level this is not an

27:32

argument to keep the name but

27:34

um the the name is one of the few things

27:36

tangible that

27:38

survives from there so there there might

27:40

be some pushback or some sadness

27:42

um but i think it's a great idea to do

27:45

exactly what emily just said

27:48

and um i i'm pretty sure that mel watt

27:51

grew up out there

27:53

i have a memory of him saying he grew up

27:55

in dixie and i'm going

27:56

where's that so i do think there was a

28:00

historic community there and it was

28:02

not a historically all-white community

28:04

and um

28:06

i i think throw this ball back to the

28:08

developers

28:09

you know and i think there's also not

28:11

going to be a whole lot left of it

28:13

anyway

28:13

um but it's just a little

28:16

factoid that we might want to remember

28:20

so mary i'm sorry what are you saying

28:22

you would support including this as an

28:24

example or not

28:25

i would support the language that says

28:28

new developments um

28:30

consider naming and renaming

28:35

and and let them figure out whether they

28:37

want to wipe out i mean developers love

28:39

to wipe out

28:39

historic communities so they may not

28:42

blink an eye at it

28:44

but there there was a community there

28:46

and i think there's still fragments of

28:47

it there

28:48

and whether we want to totally rename it

28:50

or not is you know

28:52

a question i would guess mel watt would

28:56

be okay with renaming it but

28:58

um but i think we need to just think

29:01

about that

29:02

that's more and to me dixie is one of

29:04

those it's been such a widespread name

29:06

across the south it's kind of like

29:07

plantation um

29:09

i think it will phase out um but also i

29:12

think we may be opening a can of worms

29:14

if we say and dixie's on the hit list

29:18

i think that they want it on the hit

29:19

list oh the developers do

29:22

yeah i'm sure the developers do getting

29:25

support to get dixie dropped from they

29:27

just want it to be the river district

29:29

but the developers are having a hard

29:30

time getting dixie dropped and they were

29:33

hoping that this commission

29:34

um could hopefully assist with their

29:37

efforts

29:38

to to get the dixie portion of the name

29:41

removed from that from that development

29:43

area

29:45

why are they having a hard time get the

29:46

name getting the name dropped

29:48

who's opposing it um emily you may know

29:51

better than me from her

29:52

from conversations but i believe just

29:55

going back and forth between the county

29:56

the line is not just in the city limits

29:59

it goes from your county

30:00

um it sends beyond the city into county

30:03

which is not

30:03

a city jurisdiction yeah it's a

30:05

complicated

30:06

it's a complicated it's a part of it or

30:09

all of it is understated in county

30:11

jurisdiction

30:12

but the river district once it's its

30:16

form is going to be annexed then it will

30:18

be part of the city

30:19

so then it would be under city control

30:22

so i i don't understand lena you may

30:25

know better than i

30:26

i didn't understand all her uh her

30:29

explanation

30:31

but um

30:35

um lynn what were you gonna say well i

30:38

was thinking you know we've

30:39

got about i don't know 50 60 of these

30:43

other names slaveholders and

30:45

uh dixie and plantation and this and

30:47

that and i don't know that we will

30:49

necessarily ever want to recommend

30:51

changing all of those but

30:53

i would say when a neighborhood or a

30:55

property owners

30:57

people come to you and say we want to

30:58

change our name or our street

31:01

you know i thought i think you know

31:05

because we think dixie is uh something

31:07

that's not uh

31:08

just not inclusive then i don't see a

31:12

reason why we wouldn't uh you know

31:14

support that i mean

31:16

may not be something we're going to go

31:17

out and do overall but uh it'll

31:20

it but this is this i'm not even sure

31:22

i'm kind of

31:23

this request is a little strange because

31:25

it almost seems like they could just go

31:26

to the

31:27

go through the normal process of

31:29

changing it but you say that getting all

31:30

this pushback so they think

31:32

it's not from the city it's from the

31:34

county the state

31:36

yeah well

31:39

that's right what tiffany i'm sorry

31:42

you're correct

31:42

the city has not given this pushback on

31:44

this it's just outside of our

31:45

jurisdiction

31:50

emily and this is mike stillman i do

31:52

commercial

31:53

real estate and i think that if we're

31:55

not cautious here

31:56

we're starting to get into perhaps

31:59

individuals that have a different motive

32:01

not that their motives are not positive

32:03

or good but their objective is to make

32:05

money

32:05

and i think if we're not careful we are

32:08

getting into an area that perhaps

32:11

will gray our intention or at least our

32:14

charge

32:15

okay um

32:20

let me ask you this since i will be

32:22

speaking um

32:26

do we want to keep that recommendation

32:28

because it seems to me

32:30

uh i mean the recommendation tiffany i

32:33

don't have it in front of me but the tip

32:35

the recommendation says the commission

32:38

encourages and supports neighborhoods

32:40

and developers

32:41

who request street name changes so do we

32:44

not want to

32:45

mike i'm not i'm just saying if if what

32:48

you just

32:48

said and are we keeping that

32:52

recommendation because as we said we

32:55

endorse the whole group gave thumbs up

32:59

to that

32:59

recommendation um what i could

33:03

i mean i guess the way i could thread

33:06

the needle

33:08

this is what we had said the supports

33:11

encourages the efforts of neighborhoods

33:13

that petition

33:16

you know so i mean if we're not going to

33:19

support that

33:20

that's okay but we it's we're saying two

33:23

different things

33:24

i guess is what i'm trying to say um

33:30

the recommendation itself is

33:32

sufficiently broad

33:33

and i think that's fine i think maybe

33:35

mike is warning against

33:36

specific developers or we wouldn't want

33:39

to be

33:39

necessarily on the record uh advocating

33:43

for one

33:43

more than any other but i think the

33:45

recommendation as it's worded is fine

33:47

and

33:48

it still gets back to this question of

33:50

how the city

33:51

through its implementation and

33:53

enforcement process

33:55

under the ordinance would take that into

33:56

consideration if it's for an existing

33:58

street name as dixie river is

34:00

or if it's for new street names going

34:02

forward i think the jurisdiction

34:04

question gets a little more

34:06

and maybe kathy or someone will know

34:07

more there may be portions of it that

34:09

are in the city limits portions that are

34:10

in the

34:11

etj the extra-territorial jurisdiction

34:14

of the city and then there may be

34:15

portions that are controlled by the

34:17

state by ncdot

34:18

so i think that might complicate a

34:20

street that meanders

34:21

in and out of the city

34:25

okay that's exactly what we're faced

34:29

with on

34:29

on some other so let me ask

34:33

i want to i want to accurately reflect

34:36

the will of the full commission

34:39

on monday night i your recommendation

34:42

is that i read that and make no mention

34:45

of

34:46

any whether it's plantation estates

34:49

whether it's the river district or

34:52

to say that these are ones that are up

34:54

for consideration

34:55

or just leave it alone don't say

34:57

anything about anything in specifics

35:06

just a correction plantation estates is

35:09

in matthews and it's actually

35:11

they're make i guess they've already

35:12

cleared whether they need to clear to

35:14

change their

35:14

their strength yes i mean they're a

35:16

private developer i think we talked

35:18

about that

35:19

um i mean i'm really just asking

35:25

just make that recommendation with no

35:27

comment about any current changes

35:33

yeah i'm comfortable with that emily go

35:35

for it okay

35:36

okay okay well and i know nobody asked

35:40

but i would just

35:40

interject and lena correct me if i'm

35:42

saying something out of

35:44

turn i think i think that

35:47

hey what's up the understanding

35:51

on our end is that this commission is

35:54

going to make

35:56

recommendations for a policy

36:00

moving forward but the real prescriptive

36:03

kinds of things that need to happen

36:06

[Music]

36:07

um at the staff level end up becoming

36:11

our project to work out after

36:14

council's recommendation is that is that

36:17

a fair

36:18

um assumption

36:25

i try to be careful not to assume

36:27

anything but i think the

36:29

commission is making recommendations to

36:31

the council

36:32

and it will be up to council whether or

36:34

not to adopt those recommendations

36:37

and if they do adopt it and develop a

36:39

policy as a result of it then i think it

36:41

trickles down and we have to think

36:43

through

36:43

what's the existing authority we have

36:45

for what we need to do in order to carry

36:47

that out

36:48

and if there are any changes that need

36:49

to be made

36:51

including possibly ordinance revisions

36:53

and so that's the piece that i was

36:55

trying to touch on

36:56

but i think generally yes i think the

36:58

certainly the charge of the commission

37:00

is to make recommendations including for

37:02

example this one

37:03

with respect to consideration of future

37:05

streams

37:07

thanks you just said it a lot better

37:08

than i did

37:11

no i'm fine i will just make the

37:13

recommendation with no mention of any

37:15

examples

37:16

within or without the city's um

37:18

[Music]

37:20

jurisdiction um

37:25

tiffany i'm sorry i'm i'm coming are we

37:28

ready for the

37:29

the feedback or we or was there another

37:32

item i'm sorry i don't have the agenda

37:35

no i just record with the feedback if

37:36

there's another comment

37:38

uh let me just see one thing um

37:43

yeah sorry i'm i'm working i have a new

37:46

phone and i haven't quite

37:47

figured out all the bells and whistles

37:50

on it just yeah

37:52

um yeah so community feedback

37:56

um it is going to be compiled

37:59

through next well through sunday and so

38:03

uh

38:05

i will be reporting out whatever we have

38:07

heard through that

38:09

or a high level through that point uh

38:11

tiffany

38:12

is going to give you uh sort of some

38:15

summary

38:15

findings to date and then i received

38:18

just

38:19

about an hour ago some of the actual

38:22

comments and i've scanned them really

38:24

quickly and i can give you the flavor

38:26

and then they will be sent out to you

38:28

shortly um

38:30

but i think that

38:34

tiffany i'll let you go and then i'll

38:35

add my commentary from what i've just

38:39

gathered quickly sure so and i know this

38:42

is um

38:43

kind of smaller to read i'll try to blow

38:45

it up um but what you're looking at here

38:47

the first uh data point that we got um

38:49

information from is from next door

38:52

so in this column a you'll see where we

38:54

uh broke it down essentially by

38:56

area these are the next door areas that

38:57

we have here in in

39:00

in charlotte and you'll see the total

39:01

number members of

39:03

next door here um but what you'll want

39:06

to pay attention to is basically on you

39:08

know we did a poll for them

39:10

yes or no um if they agreed with the

39:13

legacy commission's proposed

39:15

recommendations we of course have a link

39:16

but just to get a quick

39:17

pull from the next door um members

39:21

and this is where we stand here this pie

39:23

chart here based off the responses we've

39:25

received we received

39:26

um 4

39:30

433 responses of those

39:34

54.48 were no we do not agree with the

39:38

proposed recommendations

39:40

45.52 said yes they do agree with the

39:43

proposed recommendations

39:46

some areas you'll see a higher level

39:48

southeast

39:49

um areas you'll see a higher level of

39:51

percentage of nodes

39:53

than some of the more um areas that we

39:58

typically call the crescent but i hate

39:59

that term so um so you can kind of see a

40:01

breakdown of where the areas are

40:03

significantly a little higher for a

40:05

percentage of nodes and a significantly

40:07

higher low percentage of

40:09

and i will send all this data out to you

40:12

um after

40:13

this meeting so you can glean through it

40:14

i'm not going to ask everybody to do a

40:16

vision test

40:16

um i just wanted to have everybody

40:19

having a

40:20

general idea of what we've heard so far

40:22

for us to have been um

40:24

just south of a week getting this kind

40:27

of response is pretty incredible i will

40:29

say that typically

40:30

we do not always have a lot of uh

40:32

response considering also this is all

40:34

online right we have no

40:35

ability to have uh go door-to-door

40:38

and get campaigns which is typically how

40:40

we're a little bit more successful so

40:42

um i will pause there just so everyone

40:44

can

40:45

lean at this next door data and then i

40:48

will go into

40:49

what we received actually from the

40:50

website on those submissions

40:59

just a kind of a procedural question

41:03

does the next door um option

41:07

restrict people from voting more than

41:10

one time

41:12

no it does not um we do not have that um

41:17

and we don't have a way of like um it's

41:20

like a poll so

41:21

it's not like they're asked they're not

41:22

asked to put like information and that

41:24

sort of thing

41:25

versus like when they um i will say the

41:28

same thing on the website they're not

41:29

restricted if they wanted to go in you

41:31

know

41:31

30 times and respond they could

41:33

definitely do that so we

41:35

have not restricted that

41:46

serious

41:49

i will also say that this work um

41:52

it's not unusual for it to be kind of

41:55

split

41:55

pretty gray i mean it's a these are

41:57

tough conversations people are typically

41:59

pretty polarized they're either going to

42:00

be overwhelmingly yes or overwhelmingly

42:02

no

42:03

and said i think you'll see that that's

42:05

what's here reflected on this quick poll

42:06

from from next door

42:11

tiffany why don't you put up the one

42:13

from the website now

42:14

sure so um from the website

42:21

can everyone see that word document

42:26

well the website everybody we can see

42:28

the pie chart now

42:30

yeah so this this is the summary of all

42:32

the website responses

42:34

um and so uh this is exactly probably

42:38

the inverse where

42:39

um the percentage of yes based off of

42:41

the website responses are 54.86

42:44

percentage or no or 43.67 and this is

42:48

based off of 547

42:50

responses from the website and there are

42:53

some yes no's that's that point five

42:54

five percent so we had about four people

42:56

say yes

42:57

no i'm assuming these are maybes and

42:59

then we have

43:00

um three people with blanks saying i'm

43:03

sorry five people with blanks three

43:05

people with yes nose

43:10

i really um when as i said i've

43:13

i've just had a few minutes to scan the

43:16

responses

43:17

um but i really welcome your feedback

43:21

after you've had a chance to read

43:22

through the comments

43:24

um the the reasoning for

43:27

the nose is really interesting

43:30

there are some that just flat out think

43:33

it's a horrible idea

43:34

there are others who that that reflected

43:38

in some of the letter one of the letters

43:40

to the editor you know that if

43:41

we need to keep it up as a reminder that

43:44

we learn from history and we don't want

43:45

to repeat it

43:46

there's that theme and then there's the

43:49

theme

43:49

of you know we shouldn't be spending our

43:52

money on this there's a lot more

43:54

pressing problems

43:56

i mean there's a lot of of those ideas

43:59

that this money would be better spent

44:01

then there are those that are just the

44:03

feasibility why are you creating this

44:04

hassle for people on the streets

44:07

um so there's a and and i didn't have

44:09

time to sort of tally

44:11

um the the you know but

44:15

there is a wide range of um

44:19

views about it i mean there's the the

44:21

interesting thing to me

44:23

um is both i would say from a majority

44:27

of people who both

44:28

support our recommendations and at le

44:32

at least my quick glance most of the

44:35

people even who oppose

44:37

believe that we need to learn from

44:38

history so i think

44:40

that um it raises some interesting

44:45

questions about our recommendation about

44:47

what the city should be doing to

44:48

disseminate more broadly history

44:51

and if they if the city applies for a

44:54

melon grant

44:55

what should the what should be created

44:58

to spark

44:59

that um educational role for learnt from

45:03

about learning from our history so

45:06

i know that this is an ideal hope it

45:09

would have been much better had we

45:10

completed the whole data set

45:12

before we had this conversation and i

45:14

know you don't even have the comments

45:16

but do you have any initial thoughts um

45:21

about how we should position our work

45:24

or you know what what

45:28

how the frame should be to counsel or

45:31

just any

45:32

observations but

45:35

the one thing i would say is tiffany

45:37

said reading through it

45:38

the comments really do reflect

45:41

polarization um you know it's not

45:44

unexpected given the state of the

45:47

country right

45:48

and i'll also add that um yeah yes you

45:51

are correct

45:52

and i think one of the things that about

45:54

the feasibility of the

45:55

of the street name changes really

45:57

weighed heavily

45:59

on a lot of respondents so i don't know

46:02

if that's something that this commission

46:03

wants to

46:04

consider um when we're talking about the

46:07

rollout of this or for council to

46:09

consider but the feasibility seems to be

46:11

a really

46:12

while they may understand and want

46:14

street name changes just on

46:16

going through that process does not uh

46:19

resonate well with with a lot of people

46:22

having said that i want to i think we're

46:24

really

46:25

characterizing the negative there are

46:27

enormous number of comments saying

46:30

thank you for this work it's about time

46:33

you know i've just moved here and for

46:36

the first time i feel

46:37

affirmed as an african-american woman

46:39

you know i live in druid hills

46:41

i you know with next to j so they're you

46:44

know you will see

46:45

both comments both right you know

46:49

it reflects um you know very different

46:53

views of history i would say

46:57

tiffany i have a question um i noticed

47:00

that there were a great

47:01

much greater number on next door as

47:04

compared to our website

47:05

how are we getting the information out

47:07

to folks i know that

47:08

i received a link and i shared it

47:10

through charlotte east and some other

47:12

social medias but what is the overall

47:14

approach to

47:15

to get that information out to respond

47:19

that's a great question so we've done

47:21

focused emails like that through

47:23

a lot of our like boards commissions

47:25

groups that are um

47:26

that we partner with with charlotte with

47:28

different initiatives so we've done

47:30

email blasts and then we've done social

47:32

media campaigns it's pinned on all of

47:35

our meeting information

47:36

it's on our home page when you go to

47:39

charlottenbc.gov and so

47:41

we've been just trying to push it out as

47:43

much as we can virtually we

47:45

did not do mailers um because it's

47:48

typically

47:49

it's a little bit more complicated to do

47:51

like a mailer in the water bill

47:52

but um we rely heavily on networks for

47:55

email

47:56

distribution um and and really partners

47:59

within the city to really push out

48:01

the link to to respondents next door is

48:04

easier what's easier

48:05

frankly because it was a full um so we

48:08

invited people to go to the website to

48:09

give more in-depth

48:11

responses but we tried to tease you if

48:13

you will

48:14

with next door so you can you know get

48:16

an idea of what was going on and read

48:18

through the recommendations um

48:20

also understanding that the the

48:22

responses are a lengthy right see a lot

48:24

of people took a lot of time to write

48:25

crap really

48:26

strong responses so um that's been our

48:29

initial campaign

48:30

we continue to push it out through all

48:32

of our social media networks

48:34

and we'll do another next door push next

48:36

week

48:37

i'm sorry we're in next week today's

48:38

wednesday it'll be good yes

48:40

sorry this is the week this is the week

48:43

i apologize so

48:44

um it's a balance between over

48:46

saturation um

48:48

and then can everyone hear me there's a

48:51

balance between over saturation

48:53

um and then uh and getting it out

48:57

sufficiently so we're hoping we continue

49:00

to be successful

49:04

tom

49:07

um i don't know whether this would be

49:09

possible or just too much work

49:10

but where you do have data on

49:14

whether folks are in favor in principle

49:19

that might be worth breaking out of

49:22

particularly the negatives

49:24

um that and see what you're telling us

49:29

it'd be great if we could see it that um

49:32

there are folks who are against and

49:35

there are folks who are

49:37

in favor in principle and um have qualms

49:40

about

49:41

um implementation have qualms about

49:43

priorities

49:45

um and and you

49:48

i appreciate you're saying that uh

49:52

anything we can do to make that visible

49:54

i think would be really good

50:09

i was just going to ask would it be

50:10

possible for

50:12

private foundations or the foundation

50:15

for the carolinas

50:16

or private donors to

50:20

provide the funding to

50:24

um alleviate the concern about the

50:28

expense related to it create some sort

50:30

of fund or something

50:34

um

50:37

i don't know outside yeah that's outside

50:40

i mean again that's a question of the

50:42

implementation

50:43

i mean that you know um

50:50

i mean the the interesting thing um i

50:54

mean some of the criticism

50:56

is really not i mean some is directed to

50:59

the commission but some is directed to

51:01

the city

51:02

for you know why are you doing this

51:05

i mean it's it's you know it's a

51:09

um you know where they're directing

51:13

those those who really don't like the

51:15

work

51:16

you know they're directing the their

51:19

uh criticism in different places um

51:22

i mean i think that what we need to do

51:25

is focus on what we were charged with

51:27

doing

51:28

and explain how we did it and why we did

51:30

it and make the case for it

51:32

i mean i think that all of that remains

51:34

the same

51:35

and i think um i actually think

51:40

there are things to be drawn in terms of

51:43

our overall recommendations as i said

51:47

from people who both oppose and

51:50

it's interesting to me i can't there's

51:52

no way to do this because we

51:54

obviously don't have the set in some

51:57

ways there are people

51:58

that are objecting to street name

52:00

changes that i

52:02

some of them i don't think would have

52:03

been somewhat

52:05

i'm not i'm not this is a supposition

52:07

but in some ways street names bother

52:10

people

52:10

more than had you changed had said you

52:13

were going to move a monument in some

52:15

ways

52:16

because they're saying no maybe that

52:18

street names are just like

52:21

wallpaper and nobody pays attention you

52:23

know and and

52:24

why are you bothering kind of things so

52:27

anyway

52:27

there's a lot for us to digest for sure

52:31

and i do welcome your feedback

52:34

and give me giving me your thoughts so

52:37

that i can synthesize

52:39

um and reflect you know the impressions

52:42

from all of us

52:44

i also really want to say that i hope

52:46

that all of you

52:47

uh if you possibly can will join the

52:50

city council

52:51

meeting next monday um and

52:55

because of one i would like to thank and

52:56

recognize you publicly and i

52:58

i think that the mayor and the city

53:01

council would like to do the same

53:03

and i think that you may be asked to

53:06

comment um after our presentation so

53:10

for all those reasons um i very much

53:12

hope you will uh

53:14

be on the zoom

53:18

tiffany do we know anything more about

53:21

uh

53:21

when we are when where we are on the

53:23

agenda

53:25

we have not changed we are still on the

53:27

third item on the

53:28

agenda so we could

53:32

third so we could be very late so

53:35

if you sign on have something else you

53:37

can do and have dinner

53:38

and because i have a feeling it'll be a

53:42

while

53:42

if we're third okay okay

53:46

um can i just speak to the issue about

53:49

the

53:49

street names and how some people feel

53:51

like that's not

53:52

you know as important i was watching one

53:55

of these

53:56

the newscasts where they went to

53:58

interview people that lived on

54:00

jefferson davis street or jeff davis

54:02

street and

54:04

they knew exactly who jeff davis was and

54:07

felt kind of a relief and at least from

54:10

the interviews that i saw

54:12

that that was going to be going to

54:14

change um

54:16

it's one of these things that's that's

54:18

it's like

54:19

where there's this like sense of history

54:22

about the name that they even they

54:24

understood you know they might not be

54:26

historians or whatever but they lived on

54:29

a street and they understood

54:30

the meaning of that name for them um

54:34

in those interviews and to your point

54:36

that i think that everyone

54:38

was that is um regardless of what side

54:42

of the issue that they fall on they seem

54:44

to all value

54:45

history and so um which is something i

54:49

found and just

54:51

in finishing up this book i've written

54:53

about confederate monuments is that

54:56

there is this agreement about we value

54:59

history but the

55:00

it's it's what the history is and what

55:03

the in how they perceive it and i do

55:05

think that there

55:06

is an opportunity for history education

55:09

around this issue um if we can get

55:13

everybody on the same page and learning

55:15

the same history

55:16

um and not the the lost cause version of

55:19

it

55:22

that's all yeah thank you karen

55:27

other other thoughts or reactions

55:55

anyone

56:00

tom

56:07

i'm not sure if this is the appropriate

56:09

i'm not sure if this is the appropriate

56:10

moment

56:11

in the uh final report um osmond

56:14

behringer's first name uh

56:18

i'm sorry you froze

56:23

when you're tom you froze he couldn't

56:26

hear you

56:35

tom you froze we couldn't hear you

56:46

it looks like his internet connection

56:47

may have gone out he has an arrow so

56:49

we'll give him a couple minutes

56:51

um and as long as we're doing can you

56:53

can y'all hear me this is mary as long

56:54

as we're doing little corrections on liz

56:56

hare's first name elizabeth

56:58

is with an s not a z okay

57:08

hi mary to confirm that the liz is l i z

57:11

right the nickname

57:12

yeah l-i-c but her um i mean i actually

57:15

checked with her obituary just to be

57:17

sure

57:17

and i was pretty sure it was an s and it

57:19

is elizabeth with an

57:20

s

57:24

thank you mary tom are you back

57:34

i thought it was something about

57:35

barringer street but i couldn't hear the

57:37

rest of it yeah something about osman

57:39

tom we couldn't hear you

57:42

you're you're on mute

57:48

um i i apologize for whatever happened

57:50

there um osmond behringer was what i was

57:52

trying to say

57:54

what what about it i'm sorry um in the

57:57

uh report he got an a in his name

58:00

accidentally

58:05

got it i like that i'll make um

58:13

willie are you on the call i'm sorry i

58:15

see your name now

58:19

uh yes i'm here i don't know where you

58:23

came into any of these discussions if

58:25

you have any comments

58:26

or thoughts um

58:29

i've been listening i came in at the

58:32

tail end i think i came in about 15

58:33

minutes i

58:34

had a problem trying to locate the email

58:36

it was in my spam

58:38

um but generally i i think in terms of

58:41

um the feedback from the

58:44

audiences that i thought it was really

58:46

surprising particularly

58:49

when you said that um a lot of them

58:52

well you know i think karen had the same

58:54

sentiment that most of these people care

58:56

care about history and i generally think

59:00

i've said this i've tried to remain

59:01

neutral throughout this whole process um

59:04

but i think that history is a road map

59:07

in in many ways it's a road map and it's

59:10

accomplished

59:11

um it tells us how we got here and it

59:13

tells us where we are

59:15

and to erase a lot of the names i think

59:18

i i just i understand both sentiments

59:21

because i think

59:21

as a historian we understand that

59:24

three can be written from a number of

59:26

different ways and you just have to

59:28

find ways to um bring these narratives

59:30

in

59:31

in conversation with one another so um

59:34

it's a it's a complex topic a complex

59:37

issue

59:39

you know so i mean i really don't have

59:41

much else to add i think i've expressed

59:43

this

59:43

at the outset and um yeah it's

59:48

interesting

59:52

this is tiffany and dr cox you can

59:53

probably speak to this more than we can

59:55

when we were comparing ourselves to some

59:58

of the peer cities that are engaging in

59:59

this

60:00

work a lot of them did not go down to

60:02

the street level right a lot of them had

60:04

monuments so that's one thing to

60:05

consider when we're looking at how other

60:06

cities engage in this effort

60:08

a lot of them had monuments and when

60:10

they were either changed or they stayed

60:12

or whatever but it was a check

60:14

mark um and so they typically did not go

60:16

down to street level just because it is

60:18

um there's a lot of layers to it so

60:20

i do want to recognize that this is not

60:22

easy work so i commend everyone's

60:24

commitment to this process because

60:26

um in some ways it might have been

60:28

easier to have a monument right because

60:30

then you can just

60:31

do that one thing uh and we're we're

60:33

really addressing an entire system

60:35

so um it might be worth noting

60:38

when we're explaining this process to

60:40

persons that

60:42

that is the difference between a lot of

60:43

our other peer cities in the south

60:45

um and in the work that we're engaging

60:47

in currently

60:48

didn't um didn't atlanta deal with

60:52

street names

60:53

they did on a small scale but they

60:56

did not have a high level of community

60:59

feedback i think they only got less than

61:00

20 comments

61:02

and so city council did not feel like

61:03

their city council at the time

61:05

did not really go into they i think they

61:07

changed a couple and did

61:09

street names um and and that that were

61:12

extremely problematic in their views and

61:14

then i think they just seem

61:15

to be co street names which is what a

61:17

lot of treats are like that in new york

61:19

and they have duplicative names but we

61:22

currently do not have duplicative names

61:23

here

61:24

in north carolina

61:29

well like you know to be honest as as

61:31

this

61:32

issue evolves it will evolve beyond

61:34

monuments anyway

61:36

into things like markers and you know

61:40

street names highway names and things

61:42

like that

61:43

so in some ways this is like i think

61:46

this commission is providing some good

61:48

leadership on the issue

61:52

i agree

61:56

any final thoughts um

62:01

about the chair yeah uh this is slovassa

62:05

here can you hear me

62:06

yes thank you thank you okay i've been

62:08

playing and tic tac

62:10

with the great webex from the series

62:12

thanks tiffany

62:14

so if i go off i'll i'm gonna speak real

62:16

quickly

62:17

uh i put a couple of facebook posts up

62:20

and dr hampton saw

62:22

and we got some very couple of very

62:23

interesting feedbacks and

62:25

this afternoon at about whenever wccb

62:29

comes home i'll be interviewed by morgan

62:31

whatever the last name is vlogger

62:33

or whatever and uh i

62:36

uh complimented everybody on the board

62:38

your great leadership

62:40

and of course everybody else i told them

62:42

we had outstanding historians like

62:45

uh tom and dr willie dr tom and

62:48

and my basic thing was reconciliation

62:52

i wasn't going to let her pin me down

62:54

about the work we were doing

62:55

i simply said we were asked to do it we

62:58

had

62:59

documentation as to why there might be

63:01

some concern

63:03

that these streets might be unfavorable

63:06

to some of the citizens of charlotte and

63:08

at the end of the day uh the voting

63:11

electorate should go

63:12

voice their opinions respectively and

63:15

it's going to be up to the 11

63:17

member city council and the mayor to

63:20

decide

63:21

whether it's going to go and i conclude

63:23

it by talking about

63:24

reconciliation that street names and

63:27

everything else are fine but

63:29

in this day and time we got to come

63:31

together

63:32

all people all the americans after what

63:34

we've been through this year

63:36

and uh i think it'll come through very

63:39

favorably but that'll be only at wccb at

63:42

um

63:43

whatever time that evening news comes on

63:45

today

63:46

so just want to give you that shout out

63:49

thank you levester appreciate it very

63:51

much

63:53

the vessel you want to come work in our

63:54

communications department

63:58

i am 71 years listen i am 71 years young

64:02

and i'm trying to

64:03

i respect the coronavis mr bug and i

64:06

are not going to become friends

64:14

hey emily yeah yeah i i don't know if

64:18

it's worthwhile but i mean

64:20

i i think i say this in my section of

64:22

the of the report

64:24

but you know african-american citizens

64:27

had no say

64:28

in it whatsoever and so

64:31

when we get now that we have an

64:33

opportunity

64:34

you know to do that and it's it's a far

64:36

more representative

64:39

approach to to these you know

64:43

to the landscape of charlotte i just

64:45

think it needs to be pointed out

64:46

that you know you're you are taking the

64:49

temperature

64:50

of ever you know as many people and as a

64:53

diverse community as charlotte is

64:55

in a way that wasn't done in the early

64:58

20th century

65:00

thank you for for that reminder um

65:04

that was in the initial update um

65:08

you know that it wasn't a democratic

65:10

process that that it was a very small

65:12

group and it included no

65:14

african americans so maybe that point

65:17

needs to be

65:18

made once again it was not a democratic

65:20

process

65:22

you know so but thank you for that

65:23

reminder i i had begun to think about my

65:26

presentation but i really wanted to wait

65:28

to get feedback and to hear from the

65:30

commission today

65:31

before i really uh shape it so i really

65:34

do

65:34

if you have chance today or tomorrow

65:36

morning to

65:38

review all the feedback and then send me

65:40

your thoughts

65:41

uh it'd be really helpful um

65:44

fannie i see you've just joined us i'm

65:47

not sure when you

65:48

join so i don't do you have any

65:50

reflections or thoughts you want to add

65:57

i can't hear we can't hear you

66:08

sorry

66:11

it looks like she may be having some

66:12

connectivity um yeah

66:15

i don't know yes

66:20

i'm sorry fannie we can't hear you you

66:22

must be having connectivity issues

66:25

uh one thing i would say um to that

66:28

point

66:28

about everyone that we can hear and we

66:31

can't hear

66:32

when you when you um

66:35

um tiffany i don't know how to make this

66:37

possible if you would send the

66:39

your comments to tiffany and me and then

66:42

tiffany will compile them

66:43

and we want to share the full range of

66:46

feedback from the commission with one

66:48

another

66:49

um you know so

66:52

meaning i'll send everyone just where we

66:54

are the full download of all the

66:56

responses we've received

66:57

so in your in your free time i'm sure

66:59

everyone has a ton of free time right

67:00

now right here at the holidays right

67:02

um if you want to glean through that so

67:03

you have an idea of what what the

67:05

feedback has been so far

67:07

um and so you'll have you'll have that

67:08

and then you'll get another update next

67:09

week with that final push

67:11

yeah well thank you all this

67:14

has been um quite a learning experience

67:17

and i've learned so much from each of

67:19

you and

67:21

the historians just a major shout out to

67:24

dr griffin dr cox um

67:27

and um you know we will see where

67:30

the city council takes it you know what

67:34

they decide to do

67:35

um my i really

67:38

underscore i hope you will be with us

67:40

because my sense is

67:42

there was a lot of discussion just after

67:44

the update and i suspect it will be a

67:47

lot of discussion

67:49

and q and a uh about the recommendations

67:53

and um you know it would be great to

67:56

have you there

67:57

and they may call on you to comment as

67:59

well

68:00

um so i i you know really hope you'll be

68:03

there

68:04

next monday tiffany did you have

68:06

something sure just

68:07

logistically like i have a list already

68:09

of persons who've responded but if you

68:11

need to have

68:12

to be added to that list if you're it

68:13

would like to attend and you're able to

68:14

attend

68:15

um and the meeting coordinator will send

68:17

out the webex link for that meeting on

68:19

monday

68:20

um so i'll make sure she has all of your

68:21

contact information so that all of you

68:23

can be on the websites for monday

68:27

and this point of personal privilege i

68:29

just wanted to thank emily for her

68:30

leadership this is my first time ever

68:31

being a staff resource for this type of

68:34

work and so i appreciate everybody's

68:35

flexibility in a time when we had to be

68:37

100 virtual

68:38

first time in 100 virtual so that's

68:41

that's something so i just want to say

68:44

so i appreciate emily and her leadership

68:46

and helping me and guiding me and i

68:48

thank each and every one of you for your

68:50

commitment to this work it does not go

68:52

unnoticed how much time and commitment

68:54

it takes

68:55

a huge thank you from from my humble

68:57

self

68:59

and a huge shout out to tiffany she's

69:01

been the best

69:04

she's absolutely the best um

69:07

[Music]

69:08

well anyone have any um

69:13

any final comments before monday please

69:16

send written comments to tiffany and me

69:18

and you know look forward to seeing you

69:22

monday

69:26

thank you thank you very much

69:32

thanks

70:00

so

70:26

[Music]

70:29

you

Legacy Commission Meeting videos

Survey and Voting Process

Participate in renaming Jefferson Davis Street (for residents, businesses and property owners in the Druid Hills community OR in a one mile radius from Jefferson Davis Street).

Jefferson Davis Street Renaming Survey

The survey is open June 21 through June 18. Voting on final recommended names will be open from July 26 through August 9.

Residents and businesses are required to enter their address to prove they reside or own property on the specific street.

A timeline for each street renaming project is displayed below.

The voting process will begin with community engagement opportunities. To learn more or if you require assistance, email legacy@charlottenc.gov.

Streets that will be renamed and why

The Legacy Commission identified that the highest priority for change should be streets named for leaders of the Confederacy and white supremacists who actively fought to defend slavery and against racial equality. Upon the Commission’s recommendations, City Council authorized the City to move expeditiously to change the names of the streets listed below:

Beyond Charles Brantley Aycock (Wayne County) and William Brantley Aycock (Wilson County), there are no other famous or influential persons from North Carolina who carry the Aycock name. William was a longtime law professor at UNC School of Law and served as chancellor of UNC from 1957 until 1964. Aycock Lane is most likely named in honor of Charles Aycock, who, beginning in 1900, served as the state’s 50th governor. According to historian H. Leon Prather, Aycock was the “king of oratory” and the “Democratic Moses who led North Carolina out of the darkness and chaos of Negro domination.” Aycock is remembered as the primary architect of the state’s White Supremacy Movement, which fully emerged in 1898 and was responsible for disfranchising African Americans in 1901. He is fondly referred to as North Carolina’s “education governor.” The street is located in a subdivision just south of Dilworth, off of Scaleybark Road.

Barringer is a prominent family name in the Mecklenburg and Cabarrus County region. John Paul Barringer and his eldest son, John Sr., were members of the Mecklenburg Militia during the Revolutionary War. When John Paul died in 1807, he was 86 years old and owned 13 slaves and hundreds of acres of land in Cabarrus County. By 1838, John Sr. owned three plantations, two stores, a tannery, and a cotton mill around Concord. Although he owned as many as 15 slaves, he eventually reached the point where he was no longer in favor of the institution. But instead of granting them freedom, he deeded them to his son, Paul Brandon, who took them further south to Mississippi. His three other sons, Rufus, Moreau, and Victor, were all lawyers and served the state as elected politicians. In the 1850s, Rufus was a prominent Whig, a forerunner of the Republican Party, who favored African American suffrage. Initially, he was against secession, but after the state seceded, he was among the first to volunteer. Rufus rose to the brigadier general’s rank, but he served as a Republican after the war. Rufus was the father of Warren C. Coleman, who was perhaps the wealthiest African American in North Carolina from Reconstruction through the turn of the twentieth century. Barringer advocated for African American rights following the Civil War, yet his sons, Paul B. Barringer and Osmond M. Barringer, espoused white supremacy ideals. Paul became a leader in the field of “scientific” racism at the University of Virginia in the late 1800s, and Osmond was a leader in the local white supremacy club movement in Charlotte at the turn of the twentieth century. Osmond also fought against the desegregation of public facilities in Charlotte in the 1950s. Accord ing to Osmond, Barringer Drive was named in his honor. The street is located in West Charlotte. It extends south from West Boulevard, snaking across Remount Road and Clanton Road before coming to an end at Pressley Road.

Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson was born in Clarksburg, Virginia, in 1824 and died in Guinea, Virginia, in 1863. As an 1846 graduate of West Point, he sided with the Confederacy at the start of the Civil War and quickly rose in prominence. Military historians regard him as the most gifted tactical commander in the Confederacy, and his military exploits became legendary and were an essential element of the ideology of the Lost Cause. There are several streets named in honor of Stonewall Jackson. The most prominent is East Stonewall Street, located in uptown Charlotte. The street extends from South Mint and South Graham, at Bank of America Stadium, east to Kenilworth Avenue. For many years, local defenders of Jackson’s legacy claimed the street was named to honor his second wife, Mary Anna Morrison, whom he married in 1857. She was from North Carolina, where her father was President of Davidson College. Following their marriage, the couple lived in Lexington, Virginia, where Jackson was a Virginia Military Institute professor. Following Jackson’s death, she moved to Charlotte into a home was located on East Third Street, which is now East Stonewall Street. There is a Stonewall Jackson Homes Drive located in a private low-income rental community at 5751 Airport Drive off West Boulevard. According to a 1947 Charlotte News article, Jackson Avenue, located off East 10th Street, directly across from Piedmont Open IB Middle School, is also named in honor of Stonewall Jackson.

During the Civil War, Jefferson Davis served as President of the Confederate States from 1861 to 1865. At the war’s end, he encouraged reconciliation and implored Southerners to be loyal to the Union. However, by the 1880s, former Confederates saw him as a hero of the Lost Cause of the Confederacy. Jefferson Davis was born in Fairview, Kentucky, and died in New Orleans, Louisiana. He had no extensive ties to Charlotte, beyond retreating to the city during the last days of the Civil War and holding his final executive cabinet meeting at William Phifer’s home. There is a Jefferson Davis Street located in the Druid Hill community in West Charlotte. The street is dead-ended at both ends and has only one cross street, Moretz Avenue.


Street Renaming/Voting Survey (Residents/Property Owners Only)

Cameron A. Morrison was a prominent leader of the ‘Red Shirts,’ the paramilitary wing of the state Democratic Party’s White Supremacy campaign that worked to suppress and terrorize black voters in North Carolina in the late 1890s. In 1920, Morrison successfully ran for Governor of North Carolina on the platform that he fought gloriously for the cause of White Supremacy. Morrison served as the state’s 55th governor and is commonly referred to as the “Good Roads Governor.” Under his leadership, the government systematically made use of black convict labor to help build state roads. In the mid-1920s, Morrison purchased upwards of 3000 acres in what is now South Charlotte to build his Morrocroft Estate. Over the years, most of the land surrounding his home was sold to local developers. Today, the area comprises Barclay Downs and South Park. Morrison Boulevard and Governor Morrison Street are named in his honor. There are several other prominent buildings and apartments named in Morrison’s memory, including Southpark Morrison, Morrison Condos, Morrison Family YMCA, and Morrison Library. The name of the Morrison Library was recently changed o the South Park Library because of the association of Morrision with white supremacy.

William Phifer was from Catawba and came to Charlotte in 1852. He inherited a great deal of land, money, and enslaved Africans. Phifer owned approximately 28 enslaved people, making him one of the two largest slave owners in the city. The Phifer home occupied an entire block, from Phifer Avenue to College Street to Eleventh Street, and included a well-designed garden, a sixty-foot well, a springhouse, a carriage house, a garden house, and smokehouse. It was part of his larger four- thousand-acre estate. In early 1865, Phifer’s property served as the headquarters for General Pierre G.T. Beauregard, and two weeks after the Confederacy officially surrendered at Appomattox on April 9, 1865, the Confederate Cabinet met for the last time in Phifer’s home. Today, Phifer Avenue connects North Tryon to North College between East 9th and East 11th Streets. The street runs perpendicular to the Hal Marshall Center.

Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson was born in Clarksburg, Virginia, in 1824 and died in Guinea, Virginia, in 1863. As an 1846 graduate of West Point, he sided with the Confederacy at the start of the Civil War and quickly rose in prominence. Military historians regard him as the most gifted tactical commander in the Confederacy, and his military exploits became legendary and were an essential element of the ideology of the Lost Cause. There are several streets named in honor of Stonewall Jackson. The most prominent is East Stonewall Street, located in uptown Charlotte. The street extends from South Mint and South Graham, at Bank of America Stadium, east to Kenilworth Avenue. For many years, local defenders of Jackson’s legacy claimed the street was named to honor his second wife, Mary Anna Morrison, whom he married in 1857. She was from North Carolina, where her father was President of Davidson College. Following their marriage, the couple lived in Lexington, Virginia, where Jackson was a Virginia Military Institute professor. Following Jackson’s death, she moved to Charlotte into a home was located on East Third Street, which is now East Stonewall Street. There is a Stonewall Jackson Homes Drive located in a private low-income rental community at 5751 Airport Drive off West Boulevard. According to a 1947 Charlotte News article, Jackson Avenue, located off East 10th Street, directly across from Piedmont Open IB Middle School, is also named in honor of Stonewall Jackson.

Daniel H. Hill was a Confederate officer who spent time before and after the Civil War in Charlotte. He was born in York County, South Carolina, on July 12, 1821, and died in Charlotte on September 24, 1889. Hill served on the faculties of Washington College (later Washington and Lee University) from 1849 to 1854 and Davidson College from 1854 through 1859, when he became principal of the North Carolina Military Academy in Charlotte. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he was commissioned as a colonel and led The Charlotte Greys, a local regiment, in usurping the city’s branch of the U.S. Mint. He quickly rose to brigadier general to major general and commander of the Army of Northern Virginia. Hill is remembered for his college textbook, Elements of Algebra, and for leading critical strategic victories during the war, and finally for editing a Charlotte-based magazine, The Land We Love, which was influential throughout the South from 1866 through 1869. Hill eventually became a prominent educator in the South, serving as presidents of Arkansas Industrial University, Middle Georgia Military and Agricultural College. Hill was also instrumental in writing several Civil War histories. West Hill Street is named in his honor. The street is located in uptown Charlotte and extends east from McNinch Street to Eldridge Street, just outside Bank of America Stadium. The street again picks up on the east side of the stadium, stretching from South Church Street across South Tryon and becomes East Hill for one city block ending at South College Street.

Zebulon Baird Vance entered politics in North Carolina in the 1850s. In 1854 he was elected to Congress and again in 1859. In 1861, after the South succeeded from the Union, Vance refused to serve on the Confederate Congress, instead choosing to fight. He eventually rose to the rank of colonel of the Twenty-sixth North Carolina Regiment. In 1862, he accepted the Conservative party nomination for Governor and handily defeated Democratic candidate, William Johnston of Mecklenburg County. Vance was North Carolina’s Confederate Governor from 1862 through 1865. His re-election as Governor in 1877 symbolized the return to power of slavery-era leaders. Zebulon Avenue is located in the Smallwood community off of Rozzelles Ferry Road.

Charlotte community to choose new street names

Creating a new landscape representative of all Charlotteans requires public engagement and input. The community is crucial to this renaming effort and the City and City Council believe that the community should decide on new names. The surrounding community will be invited to submit names for consideration. Final name selections will be determined via vote by persons and businesses who reside or own property on the specific street to be renamed. Proof of address will be required.

For questions or to learn more about the Legacy Commission’s work, email legacy@charlottenc.gov.

Name recommendation criteria

  • Names should be welcoming, not frivolous, effectively brand the corridor, increase public understanding of cultural history, and fit to place.

  • Suggestions must fall into one of the following categories:

    • Activities:

      • Including sports, hobbies or pastimes.

    • Community/Places of Cultural Significance:

      • Current or historical places or objects that may embody Charlotte or are connected to the area.

    • Ecology/Environment/Local Waterways​:

      • Ideas representing CLT’s ecology including nearby lakes, greenways, creeks, native plants flora, fauna, landscape, etc Fruits, foods, vegetables or nuts

    • Individuals who have had an important and positive impact on the city, state or nation:

      • Recognize individuals who have had a significant connection to Charlotte and contributed to the city’s progress, or represent the diversity of the city’s history or individuals whose contributions have been overlooked in the past (African Americans, Native Americans, Latinx, Asians, women)

      • To ensure the benefit of historical judgment, no street should be named for a living person, and not until the individual has been deceased for a period of no less than five (5) years.

  • Persons of significance initially identified for consideration by the Legacy Commission include:


  • Annie Alexander

  • Charlie Sifford

  • Count Vincent de Rivafinoli

  • Dr. Reginald Hawkins

  • Elizabeth “Libby” Randolph

  • Elizabeth “Liz” Hair

  • Ella Baker

  • Harriet Tubman

  • Harry Golden

  • Ishmael Titus

  • Julius Chambers

  • Kelly Alexander Senior

  • King Hagler

  • Maya Angelou

  • Rosa Parks

  • Wendell Scott

Other names and categories may be considered.

Street Name Requirements and Prohibitions:

  • Name plus two-letter type (Rd, St, Ln, etc) cannot exceed 21 letters.

  • Name should include a roadway type (i.e. street, drive, way, court, lane, etc).

  • No directional prefixes or suffixes unless convention is already established for the area and fundamentally necessary to delineate location (N, S, E or W).

  • No duplication. For example, Parsons Dr., when there is already a Parsons Rd., is not permissible, but Parsons Hill Rd would be acceptable.

  • Street names involving a full name of an individual are discouraged where the individual's last name only is an available name, Amendments to this policy may be considered.

  • A full continuous street name along the length of a street is encouraged. This discourages the Morehead-Queens- Providence situation.

  • Possibly offensive names are not permitted.

  • No business names.

  • No punctuation.


STREET NAME
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
INSTALLATION

Jefferson Davis Street

June 2021 - July 2021

August 2021 – September 2021

Phifer Avenue

June 2021 - July 2021

August 2021 – September 2021

Morrison Boulevard

August 2021 - September 2021

October 2021 – January 2022

Zebulon Avenue

December 2021-January 2022

February 2022 – March 2022

Aycock Lane

December 2021-January 2022

February 2022 – March 2022

Barringer Drive

February 2022 - March 2022

April 2022 – July 2022

Stonewall Street

June 2022 - July 2022

August 2022 – February 2023

Jackson Avenue

January 2023 - February 2023

March 2023 – April 2023

West Hill Street

June 2023 - July 2023

May 2023 – August 2023