Council Wrap Up May 23

Nicole Ramsey
nramsey@charlottenc.gov
5/23/2016

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Corporate Communications & Marketing
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Council votes down Wednesday HB2 discussion; releases economic impact information

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (May 23, 2016) – Charlotte City Council removed the House Bill 2 (HB2) item from the May 23 business meeting agenda, with no action on the subject. During the mayor and city council topics portion of the meeting, a motion was put forth to discuss the topic on May 25, during the budget straw vote meeting. Council voted 7-4 against the motion.

Materials have been compiled from the Charlotte Chamber, CRVA and from Sarah Hazel in the City Manager's Office regarding the economic impact of HB2. Click here​​ to see the document.

Other Council Meeting Items

Neighborhood Exchange & Leadership Awards
City staff provided an update to council on plans for the Neighborhood Exchange & Leadership Awards Program, scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 1, 2016, at the Charlotte Convention Center. The program enhances the Neighborhood Leadership Awards event which promotes shared learning opportunities and honors the accomplishments of leaders in Charlotte's neighborhoods.

In addition to a new brand that emphasizes networking and the exchange of ideas, the program will feature expanded panel discussions and training opportunities, as well as a vendor and exhibit hall for participants.

Knight Cities Challenge grants
City Council authorized the city manager to accept grant funds totaling $112,900 from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation's Knights Cities Challenge, and adopted a budget ordinance appropriating the funds to the General Community Investment Plan. The funds will support the following winning ideas submitted by city employees:

  • "Can Do Signs," submitted by Sarah Hazel, rethinks municipal signs that typically tell people what not to do, to spur fun, imagination and positivity throughout Charlotte.
  • "CrownTownHall," submitted by Jason Lawrence, will help residents more easily connect with local government and get involved with civic issues via strategically located mobile pop-up events.

The Knight Cities Challenge, in its second year, seeks innovative ideas to make communities and neighborhoods more engaging, connected and successful. Approximately 4,700 ideas were submitted from 19 cities and 37 ideas were chosen for funding. The grants are considered one-time funds. All projects are to be completed within 18 months, which is the length of the grant terms.

Additional information about the Knight Cities Challenge can be found at knightcities.org.

Awards and Recognitions
The following recognitions and proclamations were announced during the May 23 business meeting:

  • City Manager Ron Carlee recognized Charlotte-Mecklenburg Storm Water Services for receiving the Aaa rating from Moody's. Randy Harrington, the city's chief financial officer and Management & Financial Services director, presented the rating to council and announced that Storm Water Services is the first utility of its kind to receive the Aaa Moody's rating.

  • Mayor Jennifer Roberts recognized SwimMAC Carolina CEO David Marsh and a group of this year's prospective Olympians.