Projects

​Crave​n Thomas Road /Roberts Helms Road streetscape public charrettes​

The project team conducted two public charrettes to get the community's input on the project. In order to capture a broad variety of responses, the team held both an in-person charrette at a local church, and a virtual charrette online. Visit the project page​.

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In-​person charrette

December 7, 2016 at Crossway ​Community Church

 

This word cloud represents illustrates words and phrases most frequently used in comments provided by participants who attended the in-person charrette on December 7, 2016. The larger the text, the more frequently that theme was mentioned.

Overview of responses

There were a total of 77 individuals in attendance at the charrette. All were asked to visit six stations to provide input regarding their preferences. The following is what we heard:

  • ​​Of each of the streetscape elements presented, attendees favored street trees, seating/resting areas, and pedestrian lighting.
  • Of each of the public art images, functional art, gateway/roundabout art and light art were the most popular. The preferred location for the art is within the roundabouts and along the streetscape. 
  • Participants were asked about special event options they would prefer to be held along the streetscape. A farmers market, street festivals, and food truck festivals were most favored.
  • The participants would like the project to provide pedestrian safety, planters as buffers between the vehicles and bicycle lanes, street trees, open space, and a fence to separate pedestrians and bicyclists along the bridges.
  • The community was asked to write their vision for the future streetscape project.  The participants are very interested in their history, landscaping, trees, public art, farming, and walkability.  We heard a great deal about including more research into the history of the area, especially its farming roots.  

Conclusion

The most important aspects to the community seemed to be pedestrian usability and safety and the inclusion of area history (potentially focusing on the area's agricultural/farming heritage). Lighting, street trees and landscaping were also held in high priority to the community, which makes sense considering these would need to be implemented to increase pedestrian friendliness. It sounded like functional art could be dispersed to further aid in this endeavor, and gateway and roundabout art would be installed for vehicular and bicycle oriented traffic.

View the presentation


Virtual ​charrette

January 30 - February 17, 2017


This word cloud illustrates words and phrases most frequently used in responses to the virtual charrette that took place January 30 - February 17, 2017. The larger the text, the more frequently that theme was mentioned.

Overview of responses​

There were 86 responses to the online survey reflecting the original charrette. The following is what we heard:

  • Of each of the streetscape elements presented, attendees said that street trees, landscaping, seating/resting areas and pedestrian lighting would make the greatest positive impact on the streetscape. 
  • Of each of the public art images presented, functional art, gateway/roundabout art and light art were the most popular. Participants felt the art should be dispersed throughout the streetscape rather than building a singular art piece.
  • Participants were asked about special event options they would prefer to be held along the streetscape. A farmers market, street festivals, and food truck festivals were most favored. 
  • Participants said they would like the project to provide pedestrian safety, planters as buffers between the vehicles and bicycle lanes, street trees, open space, a park and ride, and a gathering space.
  • Participants were asked how they would like the area to be transformed, and what they think the City’s focus should be. They are mostly interested in it offering pedestrian and bicycle friendliness and safety, landscaping, green space and special events.  

Conclusion

The virtual charrette responses were very similar to the in-person charrette responses. The most important aspects to the community seemed to be pedestrian friendliness and safety. History and honoring the area's agricultural/farming heritage were very popular topics in the in-person charrette but were barely mentioned throughout the online survey. Both results showed open green space, gathering areas, lighting and landscaping were high priorities to the community, which all relate to the overall focus of pedestrian friendliness. Gathering areas and open green space were two elements that received much more interest in the online survey than the charrette. The community seemed to have the same opinion about public art with functional art and gateway/roundabout art having the highest interest.  The community seems to want public art to be more versatile, usable and dispersed throughout the streetscape rather than a singular sculptural piece.

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