AR_Archive

Promote healthy neighborhoods and communities by sustaining or creating the highest quality of life, housing opportunities and economic health.


 

Challenges
   -  Key area plans and amendments were not completed in six targeted areas and business corridors due, in large part, to increases in project scopes and limited staff resources:

-  The scope of the Dilworth Plan amendment significantly expanded, with stakeholder work tentatively scheduled to continue until fall 2004.  Adoption is scheduled for spring 2005.

-  The geographic area and stakeholder involvement for the Rocky River Area Plan also significantly expanded.  Stakeholder work is underway and will continue through 2004, with adoption in the spring/summer of 2005.

-  The Oakdale Plan amendment was delayed due to work on corrective rezonings and increased scope of work for the Sunnyside and Dilworth plans.

photos of neighborhoods

-  The Arrowood/SouthTryon Plan was postponed until March due to the increased scope of the Sunnyside Plan and work on the General Development Policies.

-  The Eastway/Plaza/Harris Area Plan was delayed due to the Sunnyside scope expansion and Rocky River Road Area Plan delay.

-  The Albemarle/I-485 Plan amendment is underway, with completion expected in fall 2004.

    - 

Transit Center construction projects at three locations have been delayed.  While the final design of the SouthPark Transit Center is complete, there have been delays in implementing bus system capital improvement projects at Eastland Mall, due to an ownership change, and at
Beatties Ford Road
, due to shifting community preferences for the site of the transit center.

   -  Neighborhood improvement projects in the Polk and White neighborhoods were postponed to enable coordination of private developer and public infrastructure improvements.  However, projects were completed for four neighborhoods: Eleanore Heights, Purser/Finchley, Trinity Park and Washington Heights.

 

Achievements
   -  Housing code compliance exceeded goal, with 2,284 homes brought into compliance compared to the goal of 2,150.  A total of 2,818 housing inspections were conducted.

   -  Nuisance code compliance topped the goal of bringing 25,000 properties into compliance by 29%, with a total of 33,130 nuisance inspections conducted and 32,213 properties brought into compliance.  Nuisance violations – illegal dumping, neglect of property and dilapidated properties – directly affect the health, sanitary conditions and safety of citizens and neighborhoods.

   -  Housing unit construction and rehabilitation achieved 102% of goal, with the City and its financial partners constructing or rehabilitating 1,023 housing units, compared to a target of 1,000 units.

   -  Fair Housing education and investigation efforts continued to make progress.  Staff conducted 23 Fair Housing training sessions, investigated 37 complaints and educated 518 people about fair housing practices and protections, compared to the previous year's total of 352.

   -  Citywide litter index rating improved over FY2003 from 1.87 to 1.4.  The rating was awarded by Keep America Beautiful, Inc., which rates cities on a scale of 1 to 4, with 1 representing the highest possible score.

   -  Targeted cleanups and support of special events in the Central Business District by Solid Waste Services achieved a score of 4.9 out of a possible 5.0 on the annual Center City Performance Survey.

   -  Low-income housing assistance met 120% of goal, with 358 families and/or individuals receiving aid from the City's Neighborhood Development Department or one of its partners to purchase a home, compared to the goal of 300.  This increase is attributed in part to the low interest rates throughout FY2004.

   -  Phase 1 of the General Development Policies (GDPs) was adopted by City Council in November 2003.  The main goal of the GDPs is to provide guidance for the location, intensity and form of future development throughout the community.  The general policies will be used to provide direction in future land use plan and rezoning decisions.  Since the adoption of the first phase, 100% of transportation and land use projects approved by Council have been in accordance with these policies.